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How to train goats to electric fence

Goats + electric fence. It doesn’t need to be complicated.

Yes. I said it. It’s true. You can effectively use electric fence with goats. With a little bit of work at the beginning of the grazing season, it can work.

Importance of good goat fence

When I tell people I raise goats, the first thing I almost always hear is a story about someone they know who had a goat that got out and ate mom’s prized flower garden or climbed on dad’s favorite truck.

For myself, I knew that when we were going to start raising goats, fencing was the most important thing for our farm. Once we had our perimeter fence set up, then we started rotationally grazing our pastures. This is the process of moving our goats from one small section of pasture, called a paddock, to another every few days.

How to train goats to respect electric fencing

In order to graze I knew it was important to have the goats respect the fence. Each spring before we start rotational grazing on our farm we go through a fence training process (or refresher for our older goats).

I know fencing is a concern for many with goats, which is why I put together this Electric Fence Training Guide for Goats.

Once your goats are trained, they will respect the electric fence and you’ll be ready to raise them on pasture with regenerative grazing practices.

This 7-page comprehensive guide includes:

  • Why you should fence train goats
  • Supplies and equipment needed
  • Training paddock set up
  • Training steps
  • Tips for success
  • Frequently Asked Questions

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